Towards a Digital Ecosystem: NLP. Corpus infrastructure. Methods for Retrieving Texts and Computing Text Similarities

 

  • Methods for the detection of intertexts and text reuse, manual (e.g. crowd-sourcing) or automatic (e.g. algorithms);

  • Infrastructure for the preservation of digital texts and quotations between different text passages;

  • Linguistic preprocessing and data normalisation, such as lemmatisation of historical languages, root stemming, normalisation of variants, etc.

 


A Hackathon for Classical Tibetan

Almogi , Orna ; Dankin , Lena ; Dershowitz , Nachum ; Wolf , Lior.
We describe the course of a hackathon dedicated to the development of linguistic tools for Tibetan Buddhist studies. Over a period of five days, a group of seventeen scholars, scientists, and students developed and compared algorithms for intertextual alignment and text classification, along with some basic language tools, including a stemmer and word segmenter.

Identification of Parallel Passages Across a Large Hebrew/Aramaic Corpus

Shmidman, Avi ; Koppel, Moshe ; Porat, Ely.
We propose a method for efficiently finding all parallel passages in a large corpus, even if the passages are not quite identical due to rephrasing and orthographic variation. The key ideas are the representation of each word in the corpus by its two most infrequent letters, finding matched pairs of strings of four or five words that differ by at most one word and then identifying clusters of such matched pairs. Using this method, over 4600 parallel pairs of passages were identified in the Babylonian Talmud, a Hebrew-Aramaic corpus of over 1.8 million words, in just over 30 seconds. Empirical comparisons on sample data indicate that the coverage obtained by our method is essentially the same as that obtained using slow exhaustive methods.

Recurrent Pattern Modelling in a Corpus of Armenian Manuscript Colophons

Van Elverdinghe, Emmanuel.
Colophons of Armenian manuscripts are replete with yet untapped riches. Formulae are not the least among them: these recurrent stereotypical patterns conceal many clues as to the schools and networks of production and diffusion of books in Armenian communities. This paper proposes a methodology for exploiting these sources, as elaborated in the framework of a PhD research project about Armenian colophon formulae. Firstly, the reader is briefly introduced to the corpus of Armenian colophons and then, to the purposes of our project. In the third place, we describe our methodology, relying on lemmatization and modelling of patterns into automata. Fourthly and finally, the whole process is illustrated by a basic case study, the occasion of which is taken to outline the kind of results that can be achieved by combining this methodology with a philologico-historical approach to colophons.

Interactive Tools and Tasks for the Hebrew Bible : From Language Learning to Textual Criticism

Winther-Nielsen, Nicolai.
This contribution to a special issue on “Computer-aided processing of intertextuality” in ancient texts will illustrate how using digital tools to interact with the Hebrew Bible offers new promising perspectives for visualizing the texts and for performing tasks in education and research. This contribution explores how the corpus of the Hebrew Bible created and maintained by the Eep Talstra Centre for Bible and Computer can support new methods for modern knowledge workers within the field of digital humanities and theology be applied to ancient texts, and how this can be envisioned as a new field of digital intertextuality. The article first describes how the corpus was used to develop the Bible Online Learner as a persuasive technology to enhance language learning with, in, and around a database that acts as the engine driving interactive tasks for learners. Intertextuality in this case is a matter of active exploration and ongoing practice. Furthermore, interactive corpus-technology […]

Integrated Sequence Tagging for Medieval Latin Using Deep Representation Learning

Kestemont, Mike ; De Gussem, Jeroen.
In this paper we consider two sequence tagging tasks for medieval Latin: part-of-speech tagging and lemmatization. These are both basic, yet foundational preprocessing steps in applications such as text re-use detection. Nevertheless, they are generally complicated by the considerable orthographic variation which is typical of medieval Latin. In Digital Classics, these tasks are traditionally solved in a (i) cascaded and (ii) lexicon-dependent fashion. For example, a lexicon is used to generate all the potential lemma-tag pairs for a token, and next, a context-aware PoS-tagger is used to select the most appropriate tag-lemma pair. Apart from the problems with out-of-lexicon items, error percolation is a major downside of such approaches. In this paper we explore the possibility to elegantly solve these tasks using a single, integrated approach. For this, we make use of a layered neural network architecture from the field of deep representation learning.

Measuring and Mapping Intergeneric Allusion in Latin Poetry using Tesserae

Burns, Patrick J..
Most intertextuality in classical poetry is unmarked, that is, it lacks objective signposts to make readers aware of the presence of references to existing texts. Intergeneric relationships can pose a particular problem as scholarship has long privileged intertextual relationships between works of the same genre. This paper treats the influence of Latin love elegy on Lucan’s epic poem, Bellum Civile, by looking at two features of unmarked intertextuality: frequency and distribution. I use the Tesserae project to generate a dataset of potential intertexts between Lucan’s epic and the elegies of Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid, which are then aggregrated and mapped in Lucan’s text. This study draws two conclusions: 1. measurement of intertextual frequency shows that the elegists contribute fewer intertexts than, for example, another epic poem (Virgil’s Aeneid), though far more than the scholarly record on elegiac influence in Lucan would suggest; and 2. mapping the distribution of […]

Preprocessing Greek Papyri for Linguistic Annotation

Vierros, Marja ; Henriksson, Erik.
Greek documentary papyri form an important direct source for Ancient Greek. It has been exploited surprisingly little in Greek linguistics due to a lack of good tools for searching linguistic structures. This article presents a new tool and digital platform, “Sematia”, which enables transforming the digital texts available in TEI EpiDoc XML format to a format which can be morphologically and syntactically annotated (treebanked), and where the user can add new metadata concerning the text type, writer and handwriting of each act of writing. An important aspect in this process is to take into account the original surviving writing vs. the standardization of language and supplements made by the editors. This is performed by creating two different layers of the same text. The platform is in its early development phase. Ongoing and future developments, such as tagging linguistic variation phenomena as well as queries performed within Sematia, are discussed at the end of the article.